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The Collected Poems of Amy Clampitt
24,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

When Amy Clampitt's first book of poems, The Kingfisher, was published in January 1983, the response was jubilant. The poet was sixty-three years old, and there had been no debut like hers in recent memory. 'A dance of language,' said May Swenson. 'A genius for places,' wrote J. D. McClatchy, and the New York Times Book Review said, 'With the publication of her brilliant first book, Clampitt immediately merits consideration as one of the most distinguished contemporary poets.' She went on to publish four more collections in the next eleven years, the last one, A Silence Opens, appearing in the year she died. Now, for the first time, the five collections are brought together in a single volume, allowing us to experience anew the distinctiveness of Amy Clampitt's voice: the brilliant language--an appealing mix of formal and everyday expression--that poured out with such passion and was shaped in rhythms and patterns entirely her own. Amy Clampitt's themes are the very American ones of place and displacement. She, like her pioneer ancestors, moved frequently, but she wrote with lasting and deep feeling about all sorts of landscapes--the prairies of her Iowa childhood, the fog-wrapped coast of Maine, and places she visited in Europe, from the western isles of Scotland to Italy's lush countryside. She lived most of her adult life in New York City, and many of her best-known poems, such as 'Times Square Water Music' and 'Manhattan Elegy,' are set there. She did not hesitate to take on the larger upheavals of the twentieth century--war, Holocaust, exile--and poems like 'The Burning Child' and 'Sed de Correr' remind us of the dark nightmare lurking in the interstices of our daily existence. It is impossible to speak of Amy Clampitt's poetry without mentioning her immense, lifelong love of birds and wildflowers, a love that produced some of her most profound images--like the kingfisher's 'burnished plunge, the color / of felicity afire,' which came 'glancing like an arrow / through landscapes of untended memory' to remind her of the uninhabitable sorrow of an affair gone wrong; or the sun underfoot among the sundews, 'so dazzling / . . . that, looking, / you start to fall upward.' The Collected Poems offers us a chance to consider freshly the breadth of Amy Clampitt's vision and poetic achievement. It is a volume that her many admirers will treasure and that will provide a magnificent introduction for a new generation of readers. With a foreword by Mary Jo Salter

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 26.09.2020
Zum Angebot
Pigs, Pork, and Heartland Hogs
41,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Among the first creatures to help humans attain the goal of having enough to eat was the pig, which provided not simply enough, but general abundance. Domesticated early and easily, herds grew at astonishing rates (only rabbits are more prolific). Then, as people spread around the globe, pigs and traditions went with them, with pigs making themselves at home wherever explorers or settlers carried them. Today, pork is the most commonly consumed meat in the world-and no one else in the world produces more pork than the American Midwest. Pigs and pork feature prominently in many cuisines and are restricted by others. In the U.S. during the early1900s, pork began to lose its preeminence to beef, but today, we are witnessing a resurgence of interest in pork, with talented chefs creating delicacies out of every part of the pig. Still, while people enjoy 'pigging out,' few know much about hog history, and fewer still know of the creatures' impact on the world, and specifically the Midwest. From brats in Wisconsin to tenderloin in Iowa, barbecue in Kansas City to porketta in the Iron Range to goetta in Cincinnati, the Midwest is almost defined by pork. Here, tracking the history of pig as pork, Cynthia Clampitt offers a fun, interesting, and tasty look at pigs as culture, calling, and cuisine.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 26.09.2020
Zum Angebot
The Collected Poems of Amy Clampitt
29,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

When Amy Clampitt's first book of poems, The Kingfisher, was published in January 1983, the response was jubilant. The poet was sixty-three years old, and there had been no debut like hers in recent memory. 'A dance of language,' said May Swenson. 'A genius for places,' wrote J. D. McClatchy, and the New York Times Book Review said, 'With the publication of her brilliant first book, Clampitt immediately merits consideration as one of the most distinguished contemporary poets.' She went on to publish four more collections in the next eleven years, the last one, A Silence Opens, appearing in the year she died. Now, for the first time, the five collections are brought together in a single volume, allowing us to experience anew the distinctiveness of Amy Clampitt's voice: the brilliant language--an appealing mix of formal and everyday expression--that poured out with such passion and was shaped in rhythms and patterns entirely her own. Amy Clampitt's themes are the very American ones of place and displacement. She, like her pioneer ancestors, moved frequently, but she wrote with lasting and deep feeling about all sorts of landscapes--the prairies of her Iowa childhood, the fog-wrapped coast of Maine, and places she visited in Europe, from the western isles of Scotland to Italy's lush countryside. She lived most of her adult life in New York City, and many of her best-known poems, such as 'Times Square Water Music' and 'Manhattan Elegy,' are set there. She did not hesitate to take on the larger upheavals of the twentieth century--war, Holocaust, exile--and poems like 'The Burning Child' and 'Sed de Correr' remind us of the dark nightmare lurking in the interstices of our daily existence. It is impossible to speak of Amy Clampitt's poetry without mentioning her immense, lifelong love of birds and wildflowers, a love that produced some of her most profound images--like the kingfisher's 'burnished plunge, the color / of felicity afire,' which came 'glancing like an arrow / through landscapes of untended memory' to remind her of the uninhabitable sorrow of an affair gone wrong; or the sun underfoot among the sundews, 'so dazzling / . . . that, looking, / you start to fall upward.' The Collected Poems offers us a chance to consider freshly the breadth of Amy Clampitt's vision and poetic achievement. It is a volume that her many admirers will treasure and that will provide a magnificent introduction for a new generation of readers. With a foreword by Mary Jo Salter

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 26.09.2020
Zum Angebot
Hip Hops
13,99 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

From Li Bai's 'Bring in the Ale' to Ted Kooser's 'Beer Bottle'; from Robert Burns's' John Barleycorn' to Carol Ann Duffy's 'John Barleycorn' (no, you are not seeing double), the poems collected here attest to humankind's long and joyous (mostly) relationship with the world's most popular alcoholic beverage. A surprising number of authors, and perhaps some surprising authors, have added their tributes to the brew. Here, to name but a few, we find Charles Baudelaire, John Betjamen, William Blake, Bertolt Brecht, Raymond Carver, Amy Clampitt, Emily Dickinson, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Graves, Langston Hughes, Eric Idle, E. Nesbit, Flann O'Brien, Frank O'Hara, Sylvia Plath, Arthur RImbaud, Rumi and Hank WIlliams, all rather less than sober. Unsurprisingly, 'Anon.' is widely represented, in particularly exuberant spirits. There are recipes, and hangovers (inevitably); there's singing ... a hymn to NInkasi, ancient Sumerian goddess of beer, Prohibition protest songs and old English drinking catches; there is philosophy (of a sort), and consolation. Whether pulling up at the celestial bar in Keats's 'Mermaid Tavern' or at the grittier, jazzier one in Carl Sandburg's 'Honky Tonk in Cleveland, Ohio', lovers of beer and poetry are sure to find something to celebrate in these pages.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 26.09.2020
Zum Angebot
Pigs, Pork, and Heartland Hogs
37,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Among the first creatures to help humans attain the goal of having enough to eat was the pig, which provided not simply enough, but general abundance. Domesticated early and easily, herds grew at astonishing rates (only rabbits are more prolific). Then, as people spread around the globe, pigs and traditions went with them, with pigs making themselves at home wherever explorers or settlers carried them. Today, pork is the most commonly consumed meat in the world-and no one else in the world produces more pork than the American Midwest. Pigs and pork feature prominently in many cuisines and are restricted by others. In the U.S. during the early1900s, pork began to lose its preeminence to beef, but today, we are witnessing a resurgence of interest in pork, with talented chefs creating delicacies out of every part of the pig. Still, while people enjoy 'pigging out,' few know much about hog history, and fewer still know of the creatures' impact on the world, and specifically the Midwest. From brats in Wisconsin to tenderloin in Iowa, barbecue in Kansas City to porketta in the Iron Range to goetta in Cincinnati, the Midwest is almost defined by pork. Here, tracking the history of pig as pork, Cynthia Clampitt offers a fun, interesting, and tasty look at pigs as culture, calling, and cuisine.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 26.09.2020
Zum Angebot

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